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A Hogmanay
Wedding
Bill Young & Ann Craig both grew up in Glasgow they had been going out for about two years when they decided to get married. Ann’s mother Annie was against the marriage she felt that at 17 Ann was too young, they had several rows and at one point Ann stormed out of the house in Margaret Street. Annie herself had been only 16 when she married William Craig.
The day of the wedding arrived, 31st December 1938 and Ann dressed in a grey fur-trimmed coat and black hat, waited with her future husband for it to be their turn to be called in front of the Sheriff at The County Buildings in Ingram Street. As they waited her mother burst through the doors, Annie walked up to her daughter and exclaimed “I hope you are satisfied now”, Annie’s brother led her away, as Ann & Bill were led into the Sheriff’s chamber to be married Annie sobbed “It’s too late now, I can’t do anything more”.  The Glasgow newspaper The Sunday Post were at The County Buildings that day and Annie told them that she “disapproved very much of the wedding, I cannot forgive Ann, she is too young to know her own mind.” When the marriage proceedings were over the new Mr & Mrs Young left with their witnesses Bill’s sister Gerry and her future husband Robert Rainey, by a side entrance.
The following day the headline in the paper read “Weeping Mother pleads with 17-Year-Old Bride” there was also artist impression of Annie which you can see here.
Annie did make up with her daughter in fact Ann & Bill moved into the same tenement block as Annie. Annie died in 1955 and it was about this time that Bill & Ann decided to move to Hayes, with their five children.
The Sunday Post also ran a follow up story, 50 years later when they celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1988, with a big family party.  At the party they were presented with a copy of the front page of The Sunday Post from 1938.